Twenty-one Ways To Make Time For Measurement, Part 2

March 17, 2009 by Stacey Barr

Measuring what matters is more important than most things we give our time to. In Part 2 of this article, we’re looking at even more ways for how to become more conscious of what you can stop doing, in order to make the time for performance measurement.

12. Write yourself a compelling vision for measurement. Be clear about what you want to achieve with performance measurement by painting a picture of success, in sensory rich detail. Read this vision every day.

13. Outsource or delegate your low value tasks. Stop doing your own document formatting, internet research, meeting organisation and filing. If you can write a simple instruction for how to do it, then delegate it to graduate assistants, administrative assistants or even outsource to a virtual assistant.

14. Scale back your scope of what to measure. Just start by meaningfully measuring one area of performance, or one team’s goals. You don’t need to start with the utopian corporate measurement framework.

15. Motivate yourself and others with success stories. Research organisations that have done measurement well, and are successful on account of it. Try Harvard Business Review, Balanced Scorecard Institute, APQC and Australian Business Excellence Awards case studies.

16. Practice saying no. Take a chance and just try it. Say no to something you don’t believe is a good use of your time, or that is of lower importance than measurement of performance.

17. Avoid the office photocopier and water fountain. Avoid getting caught up in office chit-chat by avoiding the locations where it happens, and by practicing escape strategies that release you quickly if you do get caught. There are better ways to build the relationships that matter.

18. Deter interruptions with crime scene tape. Physical markers are a fun way to let people know when you really want to focus on what you’re doing. Remember to turn off your phone and automatic email checking too.

19. Save time on existing tasks by using blocks. Group related tasks together – like writing, or making phone calls – and block out chunks of time in your diary to get through them. It’s faster and easier to stay focused.

20. Negotiate with your manager on the relative priority of measurement. Make it clear with your manager how important measurement is relative to your other tasks, and remind and help them to actively support this decision.

21. Share these tips with others you want to involve in measurement. Just send them a copy or share them in conversation, so they too can find more time for the important performance measurement activities.

BONUS TIP: Learn how to do measurement right, the first time. Don’t waste more time by doing measurement in the old ways of brainstorming and making do with traditional measures and existing data. Create and follow a performance measurement process that works.

TAKING ACTION:
From Part 1 and Part 2 of this article, choose 5 things you can do now to stop doing what is less important than measuring performance.

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